Teaching New Drivers The Most Important Lesson: Responsibility

Drivers responsibility

It’s all too easy for the teens in your family to get excited at the sudden opening of possibilities that comes with passing their driving test. The sense of freedom that comes with being able to drive can change your life. But before you let them out on the road, you have to make sure that one lesson sinks in above all else: the lesson of responsibility. Driving lessons only teach your younger drivers so much, the rest is up to you.

Responsibility for their choices

Buying a car is where the lesson starts. When your young driver is buying their first car (or you’re buying it for them as is more likely) make sure they have their priorities straight while choosing. The aesthetic and the feel of the car might be more important to them, but make sure you’re teaching them to check for the safety features included and how exactly they make a difference on the road. Finding out the reliability of a car is just as important, as the more resilient it is, the less likely it is to break down or malfunction, endangering them on the road.

Responsibility for their driving

Much of their driving lessons will cover the mechanics of driving safely, but it doesn’t mean they’re fully prepared for all the risks out there. Defensive driving techniques, such as regularly keeping an eye on the environment around them, is essential. So, teaching young drivers to avoid distraction is important, too. In all types of passenger cars, distraction from others in the car can be a huge danger. Teach them that it’s vital to remember that the car isn’t a place to socialize. If they’re driving with friends, they have to all be aware of the risk of distracting the driver with too much noise or movement. It’s important to teach young drivers the importance of ensuring accountability in an accident, too. If they’re not at fault, knowing the steps to take after a collision can avoid making them liable for all their expenses.

Responsibility for their car

Many young people don’t think ahead as much as more experienced drivers. If their car is fine now, they might assume that it will continue to be fine. However, routine maintenance is essential. Teach them how to change their oil, replace brake pads, check and rotate tires, as well as the warning signs that someone is wrong with the car. Car malfunctions make up most breakdowns and cause a significant portion of roadside accidents. What’s more, by taking better care of their care, they’re likely to save lot a more money on trips to the garage, too.

Driving is an ongoing learning experience, and your teen is likely to have their own share of close calls and, statistically speaking, will have at least one accident in their driving life. But you can ensure they’re as best prepared for the road by sharing tips on how to prioritize safety, to take care of their car, to drive defensively, and to cope better with an emergency.

The following two tabs change content below.

Becky

Owner and Editor at Week99er
Becky is an interior designer, an adjunct professor, a foodie, a product reviewer and a gluten free blogger in Detroit, Michigan. Week99er is a family friendly site featuring products, events and recipes for your family. Contact her at [email protected]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.