monticello ice cream recipe

Edible History with American Heritage Chocolate and a Monticello Ice Cream Recipe

Everything we touch has a history, and that includes the food we eat. From it’s origins to the famous people who used to enjoy it. It’s hard to think that there really could be something brand new out there with everything is currently available. Since items have a history of their own, sometimes the simplest things can have a history that could be educational and something that kids will love to learn about.

Heritage Chocolate Review

One of those items is chocolate. It’s very rare that you meet someone who doesn’t like chocolate, and if they do it may be just a certain type. But history has a history of it’s own and can be used as a treat, and a teaching tool.

American Heritage Chocolate is one of those items, and is sold at museums throughout the country. Yes, your kids may still think they’re getting away with some junk food – but what is actually happening is they are tasting history. The chocolate is made with the original recipe that was used centuries ago. Conceived of, and crafted by, a dedicated team of historians, AMERICAN HERITAGE® Chocolate is the result of painstaking years of research by a multidisciplinary team of more than 115 experts from around the globe. Culled from the archives of some of the most venerated historic institutions, libraries and private collections in America, and in consultation with leaders in food history – from the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation to The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the passionate team has developed a chocolate product with a flavor profile drawn directly from the annals of chocolate’s historic past. It is the perfect choice for all of your home baking needs.

Heritage Chocolate Review

The result of all that research? A smooth dark chocolate that is perfect for whatever recipe you want to make or just for snacking on. With a hint of a cherry taste in the background, American Heritage chocolate is one that you may want to add to your baking list for the holidays, or to introduce to your kids as part of a history lesson.

Monticello Historic Chocolate Ice Cream – This gem from the book Dining at Monticello may be the oldest American recipe for chocolate ice cream in print. Guests to Thomas Jefferson’s White House reported our third president enjoyed ending meals with a creamy dish of ice cream.

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PREP TIME:25 minutes, TOTAL TIME:2-4 hours, NUMBER OF SERVINGS:6

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 tablespoons AMERICAN HERITAGE® Chocolate  Finely Grated Chocolate
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • 1 cup sugar
  • Salt
  • 6 large egg yolks

PREPARATION

  1. Stir together the milk, cream and vanilla bean in a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring frequently.
  2. Add the sugar and a small pinch of salt, stirring until dissolved. Gradually pour in the grated chocolate, stirring constantly, and continue stirring until completely melted.
  3. Whisk the egg yolks in a medium bowl until smooth. Gradually beat in about 1 cup of the hot chocolate milk and slowly stir the egg yolks back into the simmering liquid.
  4. Cook, stirring constantly, until the custard is thickened enough to coat the back of the spoon. Remove from the heat and stir until slightly cooled, about 5 minutes. Remove the vanilla bean (it can be rinsed, dried and re-used).
  5. Freeze in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions until set but still a little soft. Scoop into a 3-quart mold, or several smaller molds, running the spatula through the ice cream and tapping the mold firmly to remove any air bubbles. Fill the molds completely. Cover and freeze until set, about 2 to 4 hours. The ice cream may also be set without molding it: scoop it into a freezer-safe container and freeze until set.
  6. To serve molded ice cream, dip the mold briefly in hot water, or wrap briefly in a towel heated in a clothes dryer. Run a knife around the top edge to loosen the ice cream from the mold. Invert the mold over a serving dish and gently lift the mold from the ice cream.
  7. If not molded, serve in small scoops.
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Becky

Owner and Editor at Week99er
Becky is an interior designer, an adjunct professor, a foodie, a product reviewer and a gluten free blogger in Detroit, Michigan. Week99er is a family friendly site featuring products, events and recipes for your family. Contact her at [email protected]

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