Sugar Skull Candy Recipe
Sugar Skull Candy
Halloween is almost here! I wanted to make something that was creepy and not full of chemicals I can’t pronounce. What would be better for Halloween than sugar skulls? I know, I know, they’re normally for Day of the Dead Celebrations – but these are small bite sized ones and can be made any color you want.

Skull candy mold

The main tool you will need is a a candy mold. I was sent this skull mold from Wholeport in a package of great Halloween baking items. The mold is normally used for chocolates, or other candies – but why not sugar skulls? Yes, the shapes could be ghosts too, but I like the idea of being a skull – so that’s what I’m going with!

The hardest part of making these is finding Meringue Powder. I was finally able to find it at a larger JoAnn’s store near me. But do some research in your area, you may find your baking supplies stores have it.

The recipe below will make about 50 small skulls. You can make as many as you want, but since they’re pretty much pure sugar I did a “small” batch.

Sugar Skull Candy

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups white sugar
  • 1/4 cup meringue powder
  • 4 tbsp water

Step 1: 
Combine all of your ingredients in a large bowl. Do this by hand and make sure you get all of the moisture up from the bottom (the water will go right down and sit there). You will know you’re done when the sugar mixture almost has a silky but slightly sticky texture.

Step 2: 
Fill your candy mold! Pack it in as much as you can. It’s OK if there is extra on top

 Sugar Skull Candy
Step 3:
Over the bowl, use a flat object to remove the extra sugar. It should be flush to the candy molds back. Push any extra back into the bowl to reuse.

I used a chopstick for this (I know culture clash) But it was flat, easy and right in the tool drawer.

Sugar Skull Candy

This is what it should look like after you’ve scraped the extra out!

Step 4: 
On a flat surface turn your mold over set it down. Your skulls should come right out. There will always be one or two that get stuck and may need a little assistance.

Sugar Skull Candy

Step 5: 
Let them sit for 1-2 hours. This will let the water dry and them harden up.

Once they’re dry store in a container with a lid. They can last a few weeks (but wont since you’ll eat them before then).

Some older traditional sugar skull recipes use egg whites instead of water and meringue powder. You are welcome to try it if you want, I just personally don’t like using raw eggs in recipes.

Remember this recipe can be used to make any shape you want! Imagine making your own custom sugar creations to top cakes, cupcakes and more!

DIY Sugar Skull Candy

DIY Sugar Skull Candy

Ingredients

  • 4 cups white sugar
  • 1/4 cup meringue powder
  • 4 tbsp water

Instructions

  1. Combine all of your ingredients in a large bowl. Do this by hand and make sure you get all of the moisture up from the bottom (the water will go right down and sit there). You will know you're done when the sugar mixture almost has a silky but slightly sticky texture.
  2. Fill your candy mold! Pack it in as much as you can. It's OK if there is extra on top
  3. Over the bowl, use a flat object to remove the extra sugar. It should be flush to the candy molds back. Push any extra back into the bowl to reuse.
  4. On a flat surface turn your mold over set it down. Your skulls should come right out. There will always be one or two that get stuck and may need a little assistance.
  5. Let them sit for 1-2 hours. This will let the water dry and them harden up.
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1 thought on “DIY Sugar Skull Candy

  1. I got on a sugar skull kick after finding someone who makes clay day of the dead Doxies. So I got surfing for edible kits and it gave me a grin running across your post of all things. I think these days Wal-Mart carries meringue powder. I found some just a few weeks ago on a random shelf in Meijer. Forgot what recipe I was going to use it in. Then again, I do love some royal icing. I always picked pieces from Tory’s gingerbread houses before my intestines and esophagus started the revolt.

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